Dress Code: Is it Fair?

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Dress Code: Is it Fair?

A student is out of dress code, by not having a fingertip length shirt.

A student is out of dress code, by not having a fingertip length shirt.

A student is out of dress code, by not having a fingertip length shirt.

A student is out of dress code, by not having a fingertip length shirt.

Ishika Patel, Hawk Happenings Editor, Writer

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Rockwall ISD has a strict dress code policy. Students and staff tend to disagree on this topic, because they all have different perceptions of what is appropriate or not, which then turns into a wide debate over whether it is fair or not.

Shorts, skirts, and dresses must be fingertip length, straps must be three-fingers wide, shirts must be fingertip length with leggings, no backs or stomachs can be showing, and the list goes on and on. The dress code seems to be directed towards females rather than males. Boys have to keep their facial hair groomed. They also cannot wear muscle shirts inside the school. However, they can run with their shirts off in front of girls during outside practices, yet girls, once again, cannot wear shorts, leggings with a t shirt, skirts, or dresses if they are not fingertip length. Dress code sparks debate, because everyone’s body is different. A girl with short arms can wear a pair of Nike shorts and be within dress code, whereas a girl with longer arms can’t wear the same pair of Nike shorts due to them not being fingertip length on her.

There is no way to make dress code fair for everyone, but several people run out of things to wear. Tall people with long arms and legs cannot wear shorts or leggings. If someone gets dress coded for shorts, they will most likely change into leggings or a pair of jeans. If the jeans are ripped, then that is another issue because the rips have to be below fingertip length; if, they try to change into leggings, their shirt has to be fingertip length as well. When students try to find shorts, shirts, and leggings that are fingertip length and school-appropriate, they get bigger sizes in those clothes hoping they will be long enough. However, in most cases, the more sizes you go up,  the more likely clothing is to expand more in width rather than length. Once again, it becomes another problem to find clothes that are long enough to wear to school.

Some cases of dress code are reasonable; however, some teachers take their dress coding skills to extreme lengths. There have been times where a student is dress coded for their shorts being 1 inch less than fingertip length, when someone with 5 inch shorter shorts walks right past without getting caught. These situations are times when the dress code policy is unreasonable and not fair. If a student gets dress coded, they are pulled into the office, and they have to miss class, which ultimately counts as an unexcused tardy. This can lead to students getting detention, or not being able to get exempt from exams. Solutions for the school board regarding their stance on dress code can be made through making the shorts dress code wrist-length, instead of finger-tip length. 

Dress code does have a wide influence with students, staff, and even parents. The dress code can be beneficial if it used in the right ways, but if that is the case, all dress codes should be followed from each passing person. Not one person should get caught, while another escapes.

 

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